Refrigerator Pickles

In my day job I’m a university professor, which means I spend a good bit of my time trying to identify plagiarism in student papers.  It is an unpleasant task, but it goes with the territory.  If I want my head to explode, I could undertake the same investigation when looking up recipes on the internet; they all seem to be just copies of each other with only slight modifications.  So I’ll give you a disclaimer: I got this recipe mostly from the internet with a few minor modification, but I cannot for the life of me detect the original source since it is replicated on at least a dozen different sites (though I suspect it may have started with Bobby Flay).  Perhaps it doesn’t even matter.  By now, the concept of refrigerator pickles has been around long enough for the copyright to lapse, or in the parlance of the pharmaceutical industry, they are now free for generic manufacturing.

I’ve made a lot of cucumber salad off the two vines I grew this summer, so it was time to make some pickles instead.

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So, without further adieu, here is a tried and true recipe to use with your summer crop of cukes freely stolen from the interwebs and lightly modified to suit my taste.

Quick and Easy Refrigerator Pickles

3/4 c. white vinegar & 3/4 c. cider vinegar or some combination thereof

1/4 c. white sugar

4 tsp. kosher salt

1 tsp. mustard seed

1 tsp. coriander seed

1 tsp. dill seed

3/4 tsp. pepper flakes (or to taste, or omit altogether, hell, they’re your pickles)

2 c. water

2 lbs pickling cucumbers (or whatever variety you happened to have grown)

3/4 c. chopped dill

4 cloves garlic, chopped or thinly sliced

Instructions

  1. In a saucepan combine the vinegar, water, and dried herbs.  Bring to a low simmer until the salt and sugar completely dissolve.  Remove from heat and allow to cool to room temperature.
  2. Cut the cucumbers as you will; slices, spears, or what have you. In a large bowl, toss the cucumbers with the dill and garlic. Place in a jar.
  3. Add the cooled vinegar solution, cover, and place in the refrigerator.  Let them sit for a day or so (if you can wait).  Can be enjoyed for about a week.

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I didn’t grow pickling cukes but the regular old Burpee cukes I did grow worked just fine.  They were large so I cut them into spears and packed them into a 1/2 gallon canning jar.  I also had close to 3 pounds (2.9 to be exact), well over the 2 pounds the recipes call for but the recipes made more than enough pickling solution to cover them.  They are easy and they are delicious.

I have a friend who is a Serve Safe expert who claims that you can increase the refrigerator life of these pickles by omitting the garlic, which he claims is often the source of things like botulism.  As pickles rarely last long in this household I wasn’t too concerned.

 

Roasted Garlic Sriracha BBQ Sauce

I have made about a million different iterations of BBQ sauce in my life but have never really settled on a master recipe.  This problem is exacerbated by the fact that I have some friends from the south who argue at length about the relative virtues of regional BBQ variations and what, in fact, constituents a proper sauce.

Well, rather than try to mimic (or appropriate in the parlance of our time) a southern BBQ sauce, I decide to simply focus on the flavors I like and work out a master recipe that I can continue to tweak over time.  After all, I’m not a southern boy, but rather a son of Pennsylvania  now living in New England so why be fettered by BBQ provincialism?

I’d hardly call this done by any means, but initial batches are very promising.  I started with a generic BBQ sauce base that seems pretty common across the internets and built from there adding in maple syrup as a nod to my New England home, roasted garlic, and Sriracha.

Ingredients:

1/2 large sweet onion

1 head of garlic, roasted

2 cups ketchup

1/3 cup + 1 tbsp apple cider vinegar

4 tbsp brown sugar

3 tbsp maple syrup

2 tbsp Worcestershire sauce

2 1/2 tsp smoked paprika

1 tsp ground mustard

1/2 tsp black pepper

1/2 tsp garlic powder

1/2 tsp kosher salt

2 1/2 tbsp Sriracha or to taste

  1. Roast garlic in the oven and allow to cool for easy handling
  2. Roughly chop the onion and saute until it develops a golden color
  3. Add the onion to a food processor.  Remove the roasted garlic from its husk and add to the food processor.  Pulse until fine but do not turn it to mush!
  4. In a saucepan combine the onion and roasted garlic with the other ingredients and simmer until thickened (about 20 minutes or so) and adjust seasoning to taste.
  5. You can store in a container in the fridge for a week or two, or freeze it.  Given the acid content, this recipe could also be canned in a water bath canner.

That’s it!  I rarely make a recipe the same way twice but this is a good master recipe from which to tinker.  My best friend of 35 years and his family will be arriving this Sunday and I will be smoking a large brisket on the Big Green Egg.  This sauce will go nicely on a brisket sandwich.